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The U.S. Coronavirus Travel Restrictions You Need To Know

In order to contain the spread of coronavirus, the Department of Homeland Security has issued travel restrictions for those traveling between the U.S. and China on Sunday evening.

These days, the travel restrictions seem to be changing minute-by-minute, so we’ve put together a fairly comprehensive list of the goings on that travelers may need to know if they had plans going to and through China. It is intended as a quick snapshot of the travel restrictions, health screenings, airline policies and route suspensions in one place. This list will be kept up-to-date.

Perhaps the most drastic limitation is that foreign nationals who have visited China in the last 14 days won’t be allowed entry into the United States.1 U.S. citizens will be rerouted to one of several airports for enhanced health screenings, though generally most of these airports already serve as a hub for entering the U.S.

In some cases, most (if not all) of the American carriers that fly to Asia-Pacific have already begun the process of suspending flights to mainland China and Hong Kong. Generally, the airlines are waiving all change and cancellation fees, though certain restrictions might apply.

Please head to this section if you have an upcoming flight to China planned.

Extra health screenings for U.S. citizens returning home

Basically, any U.S. citizen that has traveled to China will have to undergo a health screening upon entering in the U.S., and will be asked to self-quarantine for 14 days. Those returning from the Hubei province will undergo a mandatory quarantine for 14 days.

Incoming China flights restricted to eleven airports

Originally, DHS announced that they would reroute passengers to seven airports (at no charge) but since this morning, this list has been expanded to seven airports.

Passengers that pass the screening will be rerouted to their final destination.

Here’s the full list:

  • Atlanta (ATL)
  • Chicago (ORD)
  • Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW)
  • Detroit (DTW)
  • Honolulu (HNL)
  • Los Angeles, (LAX)
  • Newark (EWR)
  • New York (JFK)
  • San Francisco (SFO)
  • Seattle (SEA)
  • Washington (IAD)

Airlines and hotel disruptions

American Airlines

American Airlines is suspending all flights to and from mainland China immediately through April 24, and will no longer operate its Hong Kong routes through April 23 (Dallas to Hong Kong) & April 24 (Los Angeles to Hong Kong).

For passengers traveling to / through / from Beijing and Shanghai, changes and cancellations will be waived as long as the ticket was bought by January 24 for travel between January 24 to March 27. The origin or destination can also be changed to Hong Kong, Tokyo (HND and NRT) and Seoul. Changes must be made by March 27.

For flights to Hong Kong, the airline will waive change or cancellation fees as long as the ticket was booked by January 28 for travel between January 28 to February 29. Changes must be made by February 29.

For flights to Wuhan, the airline will waive cancellation fees as long as the ticket was booked by January 23 for travel between January 23 to March 31. Changes are not being offered for Wuhan travel.

Delta Airlines

The airline is suspending service to mainland China starting February 6 to April 30.

(It does not operate a Hong Kong flight.)

For passengers traveling to, through, and from Beijing and Shanghai, changes and cancellations will be waived as long as the ticket was bought by January 29 for travel between January 24 to April 30. Changes must be made by May 31.

United Airlines

The airline is suspending flights to Beijing, Chengdu, and Shanghai from February 5 to March 28. Flights until February 5 will be done on a limited basis.

Though initially United planned to continue operating one flight between San Francisco and Hong Kong, the airline will also be suspending all flights to Hong Kong between February 8 and February 20.

The airline is also all change fees to rebook flights for customers traveling to Wuhan and to other destinations in mainland China and Hong Kong.

Marriott

The hotel chain is waiving cancellation fees for hotel stays through March 15. This applies toward all reservations in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan.

Any guests from from mainland China, Hong Kong, and Macau, traveling outbound to Marriott destinations globally will be allowed to cancel existing reservations free of charge.

In an unusual move,Β Bonvoy members located in mainland China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan that have a points expiration date prior to February 2021 will be granted additional time to remain active, for then which afterwards that date, it will resume.

1 footnote

  1. Immediate family of U.S. citizens, permanent residents, and flight crew are the exception.
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